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Creating A Culture Of Greatness: How Loyola’s Culture Has Allowed Its Success

Forget the big name schools who will be there, the most talked about team in this weekend’s NCAA Tournament Final Four has to be the Loyola-Chicago Ramblers. From clutch wins to the storyline of two players who have been teammates since third grade to the legend of their beloved 98-year-old team chaplain, Sister Jean Dolores-Schmidt (she’s even getting her own bobblehead doll!!), the media just can’t get enough of the fourth 11th-seeded team to make the Final Four. And rightly so. The Ramblers are an incredible story.

But the figure in the story that hasn’t gotten the attention he deserves is Loyola coach Porter Moser. Since 2011 when he took over as coach, he’s affected a culture change throughout the organization that has led to the Rambler’s first NCAA Tournament bid since 1985. It was evident from the first time I watched this team in November through last weekend that Moser loves his players and that he’s taught them to love and trust each other.

As I’ve looked at this team, two things stand out most about Coach Moser and the Ramblers.

Don’t Tell Me What I Can’t Do! Shaquem Griffin Inspires Everyone

In a world of sameness, where most of us are told what it should “look like” to be successful in our space, the NFL Scouting Combine stands out as perhaps the world’s most predictable job interview. One the one hand, draft prospects are told to stand out, to make an impression, but what teams really want is another player that fits their ideal mold for certain positions. That’s why we should all be rooting for Shaquem Griffin.

Griffin is well decorated: a two-time first-team All-American Athletic Conference linebacker, AAC Defensive Player of the Year, National Champion, and Peach Bowl MVP.

And he did all of it without a left hand.

Iowa’s Jordan Bohannon: Great People Choose To Do Right No Matter What

Put most of us in an empty field house, with complete quiet and nothing to disturb us, and almost none of us could make 34 straight free throws. Now, head to the court, heart pumping, the deafening cheer of the crowd and television cameras watching every move, and many of us couldn’t even hit two in a row! It takes a special talent to sink 34 free throws in a row. It takes an even more impressive kid like Jordan Bohannon to miss the 35th.

University of Iowa point guard, Jordan Bohannon, was on a roll. He’d hit 34 straight free throws and was at the line to sink his 35th in a tight game against Northwestern on Sunday. His next free throw wouldn’t just extend the Iowa lead, it would also make history. That was the problem.

In 1993, Iowa Forward Chris Street set the school record for consecutive free throws made at 34. Street would have tried to top that number, but the night before his team was scheduled to play again, Street’s car hit a snow plow, killing him and injuring his girlfriend. His free throw record stood for 25 years, until Bohannon had the opportunity to break it. In a world where everyone wants their name in the record books and clamors for individual validation, Jordan Bohannon went the other way.

He chose to miss.

Some of the Winning Teams Don Yaeger works with


DELL
Chevron
Microsoft
Hewlett Packard
BROCADE