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Have Don Yaeger speak to your team!

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    Mike

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    What a great and useful article!

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    Bill

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    What a wonderful blog! Thumbs up!

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      Steve

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      I agree! It is really a beautiful blog.

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      Tom

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      Yes, that is right! Loving it!

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      Don Yaeger

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      Thank you all for the positive feedback!

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    Dave

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    Thanks guys, you offer awesome themes!

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    Dave

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    Warp is quite simply the best theme framework around, and it’s great to know it is improving and developing further. Loving it!

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      Tom

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      I could not agree more :-)

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    Don Yaeger

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    Thank you guys!

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    Mike

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    Congratulations for the wonderful work!

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    Paul

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    Thanks for the job you did on this, Don. I still have this SI magazine at home, as well as the Never Die Easy book. I’m trying to tell someone about what Walter said regarding the impact athletes have on people, and I wanted to make sure I got his words correctly.

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    Joe Gidvilas

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    I bought a set of Integra single length iron heads on ebay from a USA company. They seem to be reputable with a 100% rating on ebay. I asked them if they could hand pick the heads for the correct loft and lie angles and they said they would. I received the heads and checked them on my loft and lie machine and sure enough they were out of spec. I bent them all back to spec, but they wouldn’t hold the bend. I bent them a second time and am waiting to see if they will hold the bend. These heads cost me close to $20 a head and I can see that it’s going to be an expensive experiment. So to any buyer of heads made in China beware.

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    madog

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    Great stuff Don! We met at two Midland National Life Symposiums with Jerry Blair..

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    Paul Murphy

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    If he could use a mulligan, would Coach K have done things differently in regards to his friend, Mike Pressler?

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    John Arter

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    I was wondering if you could share the video and topic on Warrick Dunn? It was the most amazing uplifting story I’ve ever got to experience. I have some of the same darkness in my life, that I don’t share much.

    Thank you again for doing what you do. I told my buddy when your older, how cool it would be and look back and realize how many lives you have been able to touch and amazing people to meet! You are truly awesome! God works in great ways!!!

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    Rob O'Keefe

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    This is a great interview! Great perspective Don. I’ve listened to this a few times now. Your MO & mantra Don is an inspiring one. Looking forward to your next book!

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    Lisa Gough

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    Thank you Don for sharing this interview with me. There are so many nuggets in this interview that pertain to me personally and to the world class culture of our team. I think my biggest take away is related to the defining moment and letting people know what you stand for. I am reminded of the importance of celebrating daily victories so others will see what it is that you stand for. I love what you said. “If you stand you will thrive, if you don’t, you will exit.” Your message is timely and very much appreciated. Thank you.

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    Rick Petry

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    Hey Don! What an awesome interview with Coach K sharing some valuable lessons you’ve learned from spending time with and interviewing the best of the best when it comes to Building a Culture of Greatness. I’m super excited about our launch of a powerful training program on this topic for corporate sales and managment teams!

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    Beverly Beattie

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    Will this session be recorded whereby we can watch it at a later date?

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    John Voso

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    Don
    Thank you. I would love to attend. May I share this with a couple co-workers?
    Safe travels

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      Jacob Blair

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      John, You may absolutely share the webinar with your co-workers. Feel free to share the link with them. If they will be watching with you we would appreciate if they could register for the webinar just so we know who will be joining us.

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    Julie

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    Don,
    This is an interactive webinar, correct? Will I need a microphone?

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      Jacob Blair

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      Julie, the webinars are completely interactive, and the software does allow microphone participation.

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    Gerald

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    Will we receive a link to access the webinar?

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      Don Yaeger

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      Yes, you will receive a link via the email address you used to register at least an hour before the webinar begins.

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    Sean Van Zant

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    What a great thought, that is concept to share! I have never thought about it this way. It is however similar to the great book that I’ve read a couple of times by John Maxwell called Failing Forward.

    Thanks again for sharing this Don! I feel this is totally applicable also in individuals lives that are not full-time athletes.

    Sean

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      Don Yaeger

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      Sean, Failing Forward is a great book. John Maxwell is one of my favorite authors and is an inspiration to my life as well. Thank you for your comment!

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    Rob O'Keefe

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    Don – a person that was made for the moment & did something truly great in a tough situation was my fraternity brother, Josh Roush https://twitter.com/Josh3Roush

    Not only did Josh step up but he changed somebody else’s life. Our friend Jeremy went blind, due to a rare hereditary eye disease called LHON, our sophomore year. Jeremy was going to drop out of school and basically give up. Josh didn’t let that happen. He encouraged Jeremy to come back to school part time and took the same classes with Jeremy to make sure he got to class & made sure professors understood the situation. Josh was truly great.

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      Don Yaeger

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      Rob, thank you for forwarding me Josh’s contact information! He sounds like a wonderful person! I am sure that your friend Jeremy was touched in an incredible way by this selfless gesture. He was truly great indeed!

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    Jackie

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    I started my “career” as a stay-at-home mom. My first adult job that paid in exchangeable funds as opposed to hugs and kisses was as a test baker in a small (less than 100 employees), family owned, food processing plant. I am sure there are less prestigious positions, but not many in a food plant. I eventually worked my way up to a Regulatory Affairs position in a major frozen food company. My advice, don’t be afraid to work at many jobs, some of which you know aren’t what you want to do forever. You will work for many years and it takes a while to figure out what strikes your fancy, what makes you want to get up each morning. Work at figuring that out by doing as many things as you can while you are young. Even do that when you aren’t so young. It took me over twenty years to figure out which part of the food business drives me, reasonates and ignites my passion. Now I feel like I could do this job forever or as long as my brain cells hold out.

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      Don Yaeger

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      Jackie, I appreciate your comment! I think that there is Great wisdom in learning as much as you can when you are young. It helps you channel your passion and ultimately decide what it is that you really like to do. Thank you for sharing your story!

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    Bill Pearson

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    Don—-After reading your “Failure is an Option”, it reminded me of an experience I had in 1961. In 1961 I was playing football under Coach Bull Cyclone Shotgun Sullivan at East Mississippi C.C. in Scooba, Ms. In 1984, Sports Ill. printed a 19 page article about Coach Sullivan “The Toughest There Ever Was”. I played three for this Coach and during that three years, several hundred players quit. My story happened in my 3rd year to play for Coach Sullivan.(that’s part of the story) Would you send me an email address because there is not enough space here. I think you will be interested. ——————Bill Pearson

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      Don Yaeger

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      Bill, thank you for your comment and sharing your story! Please feel free to send me an email at donw@donyaeger.com.

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    Wendi Thiel

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    Dear Don –

    This is such an inspiring article!

    Our team just had a 3 day intensive and I am forwarding to all of them.

    Thank you so much for sharing!

    Wendi

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      Don Yaeger

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      Wendi! Thank you for sharing the blog with your team! I appreciate you!

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    Brad

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    I saw in Brad Stevens’ locker room at Butler a sign that said “Good Teams Have Good Players, but Great Teams Have Great Teammates”.
    I love this post on Battier!

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    Tom Lusk

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    I have read your columns for years and as a recently retired educator you continue to inspire me and amaze me. Thanks for sharing.

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    Wendi Thiel

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    Thank you Don for sharing more inspiring words of truth. I love reading your posts!

    I hope this does not come across as about me in any way. This really resonated me with though. When I worked for a national law firm I always made it a point to ask the names of, and get to know, the men and women who cleaned the offices, did security work, and all of those important jobs. To your point, our office would not have functioned without them, and I always felt that I would have missed out on knowing really incredible people if I did not include them in my day to day relationship building. Great wisdom Don! Thank you!

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      Don Yaeger

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      Wendi, I admire your practice of getting to know the names of the janitorial staff. Your efforts to acknowledge them really helped build a daily bond between you and them. There is great value in knowing what matters within any organization, and a simple gesture (like yours) could make a world of a difference to someone else! Thank you for sharing!

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    Rob O'Keefe

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    Great post Don! I love Lesson 3. Some of my mentors across my life have come from unexpected places & sources. I’ve found that sometimes a mentor doesn’t necessarily have to be ultra successful or some huge personality but somebody that does that right things over and over, has humility & an ability to help you point yourself in the right direction. Awesome stuff!

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      Don Yaeger

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      Rob, thank you for sharing! The amazing thing about mentors is that they come from all walks of life. A wise mentor may not be the most glamorous, however they may be the most disciplined in helping guide you in your own journey!

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    Jimmy Bass

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    My greatest fear is disappointing those who trust me. I am motivated each day when I wake up, to plan, prepare and work hard to lead those in our organization who are giving their energies and talents to make our department better each day. Trust and loyalty are irreplaceable in a great intercollegiate athletic environment.

    Jimmy Bass
    Director of Athletics
    UNCW

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    Mac

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    The Tony La Russa story is so timely. I am currently in the final meeting phase to receive an offer from a company. My thoughts continue to be as such: I shouldn’t be here, I have a good paying, high value job with plenty of benefits and perks, a 20 minute commute, and I am fully vested and the stock has been soaring for the last 3 years. I could do this for the next 10, 12, 15 years. So why am I interviewing with a company 90 minutes from home and placing me into the unknown? I answer that by the focus that I am 52 years young, I seek to better my position in life and my life’s position, I seek, want, and relish the challenge, and as an overachiever, I wish to constantly add value and the ‘C’ words (can’t, contentment..ssshhh), scare the living hell out of me. It seems that the journey is a lonesome one because this can’t be discussed fellow workers or clients and meetings with the offering company are a solo effort. It’s a queer place/position to be in and I am trying to remain focused on the future and dump all of the noise. It is indeed a challenge. Constant positive reminders are a necessity.

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    Linda King

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    Great article about anxiety and good fear!!
    Hope all is well with you and your family, Don.
    Looks like we will have another great football season….
    Go Noles!!

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    LYNN GUERIN

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    the Good books tells us in Proverbs 1:7that “fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge and wisdom” This is not a cowering fear but a healthy fear built on respect,strength of characyer,consistency and trust,the kind you would have for your father,for a trusted leader ,teacher, coach.Think of Wooden, Lombardi,Landry,Coack K, Izzo.

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    Jim Osborne

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    I look back to a job offer that I had before leaving the military in the 70’s. I was a sgt in the Air Force, stationed in Thailand during the Vietnam war. I was making $4000 a year before taxes and facing a decision to reenlist, go back to school on the GI Bill, or go to work. I was offered a job to stay and work in Saigon for $18,000 a year tax free if I stayed 18 months. I decided to go back home and continue my education. About 8 months later, I saw helicopters picking those people up on the roof tops, barley in time to save their lives. This was in 1976. Turned out to be a good decision. I completed my AA degree, then a BS, and finally a MBA.

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      Don Yaeger

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      Jim: Wow, what a wonderful story! We must always be aware of things that can sidetrack us from our path to Greatness. Thank you for sharing!

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    Dennis Noland

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    Leaving a job when things are difficult is usually not a good move. It’s easy to quit when things get tough. I learned to stick it out and overcome the hard times then leave on top.

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      Don Yaeger

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      Dennis: It’s great to have that kind of perspective. We will always encounter difficult moments, but it’s in these moments that we truly grow. Thanks for sharing.

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    Michele

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    Don, that was a great article! it was very inspirational and it spotlights something I hope we see more of…Patriotism on and off the courts and fields.

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    Yvonne Ackerman

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    One mission moment fell into my lap when I was asked to present a $5,000 People for People Fund check to a deserving family who had fallen on hard times. The mother had been diagnosed with cancer and the father had recently went blind. The couple had more than a dozen children; some were foster children that they had adopted. Our People for People Fund board heard about their circumstances and asked if I could deliver the check to the home of this deserving family. I no sooner get in the door when everyone in the home is crying with joy. It brought tears to my eyes and gave me a healthy respect for what we were doing with our People for People Fund. Although the $5,000 hardly made a dent in their climbing medical bills, they were able to use the funds to purchase a new wash machine and much needed household items to sustain the home with so many children. I’m a proponent of everyone in our office delivering a People for People Fund check, especially when they start to question why we spend so much money a year on community members. Thanks – Yvonne

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      Don Yaeger

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      Yvonne: That is an incredible story! It is so important to remember who we can assist in our “mission.” Thank you for sharing!

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    Hardy Smith

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    Powerful lesson on culture change!

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    Brian Schuttloffel

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    It’s sad that we have to celebrate how great his parents are. It’s a shame their aren’t more like his or mine. If all parents were like that the world would be a Greater place to live. I think his achievements are tremendous and the world is a finer place for it.

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    Jerry Regier

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    Don, love your posts. When your parents are at every game, it makes you feel more accountable for your actions both on and off the field. Parental involvement makes a difference. That is what we tried to practice with our 4 children.

    When are you going to come to OKC and write an article or book on or with Kevin Durant?

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      Don Yaeger

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      Jerry: You are so right about parental involvement. Wouldn’t it be awesome if the next generation enjoyed more of that?? Fingers crossed on OKC…I’ll keep you in the loop!

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    Vicki Oakley

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    This makes me cry with joy for a man who had parents there to teach him how to be a successful human being. Growing up my parents were divorced…Dad was an over the road trucker and my Mom was stuck in the role of a “jilted lover”. Don’t get me wrong as an adult I learned more about my Dad…a GREAT man and in the last few years of her life…my Mom. However they weren’t there to teach me what I so desperately needed to learn. As an adult I have not been in “legal trouble” however I faultered through for years. My hat is off to his parents and I cry for something I so longed for in my life. My utmost respect to Derek and his parents for a wonderful lesson taught and learned.

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      Don Yaeger

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      Vicki: Thanks so much for this reply. Powerful stuff. So proud of what you’ve accomplished! I appreciate you…

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    Don Yaeger

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    Brian: It may be sad that not enough parents are like his/yours, but it is real. Here’s hoping that celebrating those who do the right thing encourages others to do the same! Thanks for the comment…

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    Thomas W. savino

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    Don,
    I am a NewYork Yankee living in Ca. I cried reading your comments regarding Derek. Real real class. His parents awesome .I remember Derek having a bad year and his Dad walking and talking to him. to encourage him out of a slump.
    My mom instilled in me the same work ethic. The same never give up,no one will give it to you .

    Thanks for sharing Derek will say farewell in Boston or New York???

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    TestX Core

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    What an inspiring legacy of a great success. For an athlete, the greatest achievement is to be a successful athlete of all season. Because being a professional athlete means you’ll going to face even more consequences and hard work on your daily lives.

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    George Ferguson

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    Don,
    I’ve always observed that a team takes on the personality of a coach. My high school and college basketball coaches were very opposite in personality and discipline and the teams reflected that both on and off the court.

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    Tim Spiker

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    Don,

    Great post. Thanks for sharing it. I would like to add something to what you have shared if I could.

    As you have pointed out, we can’t lead to our best ability at arms length. Having genuine connections with those we lead is fuel to our endeavors as leaders and organizations. One of the challenges that exists in today’s perception-driven culture, however, is that leaders are tempted to be more concerned about creating the impression they are interested in their followers rather than actually being interested in them. Those that genuinely take interest in those they lead create a powerful partnership with their followers that leaders who focus on perception management will not realize.

    Whether or not we as leaders are actually interested in those we lead, interested enough to want to know them personally, is a function of that thing that sits within the chests: our hearts. The heart of the leader determines, more than anything, if followers are actually important people to the leader or are being manipulated by the leader through the appearance of high-touch.

    It is up to us as leaders to look in the mirror to understand which type of leader we currently are and want to be: genuinely interested in our followers or merely in it to be perceived as a leader who is interested in them. The former get the very best from their followers over the long haul. Don, I suspect you observe this often in your work and saw it in wonderful and positive display in your time with Coach Wooden.

    Thanks again for the post. It is good and needed reminder.

    Tim Spiker

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    Braxton Collier

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    The last amazing presentation was in February, 2008 at the Mian Riveria in Mexico. I was at the John Deere Landscapes annual meeting. The keynote speaker for the event was Don Yeager. You talked about what makes the great ones great and how each of us could do the same thing in our lives and businesses. Since then I receive your “Daily Dose of Greatness” email. Most of them I print and use when I speak to people in substance abuse recovery, or to the familys that are dealing with a loved one with an addiction issue. That day in Mexico changed my life for ever and there is no way I can ever repay you or John Deere for what you gave me. That night you were having dinner in one of the restaurants with a friend and was invited to your table to meet you and have a toast to my brother, who owned the company I worked for, that was dying of cancer. Hearing you speak, and then meeting you at dinner made a really bad trip worth it and for that I thank you. Keep doing the great work you are doing. Thank You!

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    George Mitchell

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    As a former Maryland resident, long-time coach, and son of a legendary lacrosse coach who taught us to win and lose like gentlemen, I was incredibly disappointed at the conduct of the Maryland team. They need to demonstrate to me for quite that they understand what it means to compete with class before I will be able to root for them again. Thank you Don for calling them out and reminding them, and us, that the truly great ones respect their opponents.

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    Athena Murphy

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    I’m also a former Marylander, played many team sports there and participated for my entire youth in the great sports traditions of the state. I am embarrased and saddened by what I saw in the video. Cal Ripkin Jr. would never have pulled a stunt like that, nor would Brooks Robinson, Johnny Unitas or any other great Maryland sports luminary.

    So the question is “how many pushups does it take to cause the attitude adjustment needed here?”

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    Victoria Croft

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    I work with collegiate athletes on a daily basis, and I have never seen such a disrespectful act. I don’t know exactly what statement these young men were trying to make, but what I pull from it is that they need a lesson in respect, poise, and sportsmanship. Shame on them, and kudos to the opposing team for handling themselves with respect and dignity.

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    Michele

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    Great story! Very inspiring and what a wonderful charity.

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    ankita dheeman

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    nice way to raise awareness in critical situations

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    Bryce Cramer

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    Don
    From your experience, I’ve learned seven lessons, the six you mention, plus one you actively practice–pay attention to what others are doing around you and learn from their actions.

    Thank you once again for sharing your lessons learned. I do believe we can learn vicariously from others.

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    Roger Briggs

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    As always something to be gleaned.

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    Ken Hovland

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    Thanks Don – your rich posts are always a source of inspiration in the work that we do, building leaders one day at a time. Much appreciated!

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    Jeremy Office

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    Great write up Don. Always motivating and humbling to hear stories of the young adults who protect our country so selflessly.

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      Don Yaeger

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      Thank you Jeremy. It was truly humbling to spend some time with those dedicated, young servicemen and women!

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    Lloyd Paradiso

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    Sadly, grit has almost become a cliché. But it’s what matters most; in games, in business and in life.

    Some leads are earned, some are given and some are pure luck. But leads don’t always win. What matters is what’s on the board at the end; in games, in business and in life. Winners are those whose resilience has them on top when it’s over. That’s what really counts.

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      Don Yaeger

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      Lloyd, thank you for sharing such a thought-provoking comment! And I fully agree with you. We must never underestimate grit and the will to win from an driven individual or team!

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    Andy

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    Resiliency is most important. The St. Louis Cardinals have shown this for years under two different managers and with a number of World Series titles under their belt. Finding a way to win has been the key to their success because on paper many times they have been written off from accomplishing what they have as a team.

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    Tom Wilkinson

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    Don–
    Resilience is a critical characteristic of greatness but I’m not sure it’s at the top of the list of characteristics of greatness. You have interviewed more great athletes than I will every meet in my lifetime so I’m not sure I have the credentials to question your opinion.

    That said, I will at least offer my opinion which is, great teams don’t put themselves in a position week after week to have to come back. Great teams don’t have individuals that put their desire for attention ahead of what’s good for their university and teammates. Great teams respect their opponent enough to not fall behind in most games even to unranked teams. If you’re great you understand who you play matters and if you’re supposed to put a team “away” you do so with class and if you know you’ll be in a “dog fight” with a good team you fight with all you have to be victorious.

    The good news for you as a Florida State fan is that your team will likely be in the playoff, assuming they win this week against Georgia Tech. To win a national championship you’ll have two win two games regardless if you go into the tournament as the #1 seed or the #4 seed. So go and win and prove all the naysayers wrong. As a supporter of a team that isn’t even in the conversation any longer it’s difficult for me to feel too bad for the Seminoles.

    I continue to learn from you and appreciate your thought-provoking reflections on leadership and greatness. Keep up the great work!

    Tom Wilkinson

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      Don Yaeger

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      Tom, I totally agree that there are more characteristics than just those two. It doesn’t really come down to game control or resiliency, and your points are extremely valid. As I wrote, it would be greater to enjoy a second half, at least once this year, where Florida State put a team away. But I was comparing those two characteristics in value and I do think that out of those two characteristics, resiliency is the one I would want in a team. Thanks for your comment. I appreciate you.

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    Erik Golbiw

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    FSU should be Top 4, even though I can’t stand them, but, it will be interesting to see what happens when they go up against the tougher competition (face it, the ACC is not a quality conference right now). That said, you need a team that is resilient in business because you are not able to ‘control’ the opponent as much. I agree with your opinion on the business analogy!

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      Don Yaeger

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      Erik, thank you for your comment. And you are right with your business observation. There are many lessons in sports that we can use in the business world and our personal lives. We just have to look for them.

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    Wanda Sturm

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    Don, I totally agree with you. While I am not a Florida State fan at all and I am a huge proponent of the SEC, it has been strange to me that Alabama came out on top of the rankings. I’m happy as an SEC fan, but find that criteria that values the importance of teamwork and overcoming challenge would be much better in terms of what makes a team number one. I was unhappy with the driving up of the score against A&M that Alabama decided to do; I think giving others a chance to play and gain experience would have been a much better use of the time left in the game. thanks for the opportunity to comment.

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      Don Yaeger

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      Wanda, I appreciate that you, a SEC fan, are willing to put aside conference allegiances in order to dialogue with me on this topic. I agree, there should be a more consistent criteria for judging the top-four teams. Thanks you for your thoughtful comment!

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    Paul Kennedy

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    Don, I think resiliency is what makes teams great in the end. The team that overcame the most obstacles in the season is usually the strongest because of them.

    Paul K.

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      Don Yaeger

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      Paul, that’s an awesome observation. A team that can handle adversity, regroup, and overcome all challenges is a great team indeed. We cannot overlook this fact. Thanks for your comment!

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    FSUamb

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    If we’re just talking about this year and the current situation, this statement needs to have a caveat …
    “I don’t know about you, but given the choice between a team that wins from whistle to whistle or one that can come from behind when the stakes are highest …”.

    It should say “… a team that wins [most of the time] …” because there’s NO team that has won from whistle to whistle each and every game. All of the teams everyone loves to praise (and rank ahead of FSU) surely haven’t. If there was one, go ahead and put them in front of an undefeated, come-from-behind FSU team. But all of these ridiculous new statistic categories are just that – ridiculous. Let’s make one that is based on consistency. FSU is nothing but consistent … consistently winning. :)

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      Don Yaeger

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      I totally agree! One of the most confusing things with the committee is that their decisions don’t seem to be consistent. We’ll just have to see how the next round of games play out. Thank you for your comment! Go Noles!

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    Ricky Gamble

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    Another great example that defends this point is a high school team in florida . The Suwannee bulldogs are one game away from battling for the state title. Yet as far as their playoff games and some regular season they’ve showed no game control what so ever but found a way in the last minutes to pull ahead and win. If let to a committee they would have been written off weeks ago. Thank you for your point of view on this.

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      Don Yaeger

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      Ricky, thank you for sharing the story on Suwannee Bulldogs! They are another example of a team that figures out a way to win, no matter the circumstances! We should never underestimate the heart and will to win from a determined team!

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    Greg Petersen

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    Don,
    I thoroughly enjoy reading your articles, and here is my comment. Resiliency in all phases of life is among the greatest of virtues, while control is but a fleeting perception of the Ego, be it individual or collective as is the condition with a team or organization. Consistency in winning, or in achieving success, is defined not by the ability to control, but rather by the ability to adapt, i.e. be resilient!

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    Dave Cranfield

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    Since we’re giving out false choices ;-) … Here’s a question back at you.

    Which team would be viewed as the greatest of all time?

    1995 Nebraska who was behind for 11 minutes the entire season despite playing four teams who finished in the top ten and whose smallest margin of victory was 14 points in a game where it previously was a 35 point lead until the scrubs came in….

    OR

    2014 FSU who found ways to repeatedly be behind inferior teams and had to rely on heroic comebacks?

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      Don Yaeger

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      Hello Dave, and thanks for your comment. First, I don’t think there’s ever a “false choice” when asked to weigh attributes of success. But I will grant you that the 95 Huskers are among the best three college teams I’ve ever seen. That they were able to lead games from start to finish was awesome…but if they had been forced to come back, I’d have found that impressive, too. And remember, every team can only play those on their schedule. The key is to win.

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    Cevin Ormond

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    Interesting. Just yesterday I sought and received some feedback on my new Speaker One-Sheet then immediately made changes based upon those recommendations. There’s no value in seeking mentors and feedback if you don’t implement their recommendations.

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      Don Yaeger

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      Cervin, you absolutely nailed the point of my blog with your comment. Feedback is only as good as it’s implementation. If we don’t do something with it, then it’s only wasted advice on our part. Thanks for sharing!

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    Davide

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    Hi Don!

    Your comments are very true! I was the type to take feedback I thought was negative and ignored it. As I moved up in my company, my current supervisor told me that I have unlimited potential but there are obstacles in my way that she knows will get in my way of getting to the next level. By this she meant I needed to get a higher level degree to even be looked at for a higher position. I applied for several positions and sure enough I didn’t get an interview. I talked with her again she gave me the same advice. I am now looking to get that degree but I have wasted almost a year by not taking her feedback!

    I believe feedback should be taken in both personal and professional situations.

    Thanks!

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      Don Yaeger

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      Davide, thank you for sharing your experience. I think it’s always important to recognize the lessons that will have a long-term impact on our lives. This is a maturation process that everyone goes through. Whenever we receive advice, we should evaluate how it can make us better and not how it makes us feel. Best of luck to you and your future endeavors!

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    Ray Ramirez

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    If you are a boss, how do you seek honest feedback that can help? And those who give it (employees) in a small 4 person office won’t feel intimidated by giving the feedback that is hard to share with the person who has the capacity to fire them?
    And then how do you let them realize that by doing so does NOT give them the right to never be criticized or corected?

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    David Shifflett

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    Good Day Don,
    Let me start with that I always enjoy reading your articles. As a retired Air Force Aircraft Maintenance Superintendent, I always wanted my airmen to challenge me. It helped me stay current and it helped educate them. They all knew that if they were uncomfortable with tasks we needed to accomplish they could come to me for direction. Now obviously they had to be professional in the manner in which they challenged me.

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      Don Yaeger

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      David, that is an awesome example of remaining sharp with the considerations of your peers. (And a great show of leadership as well!) Thank you for sharing your story!

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    Milan Larson

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    Hi Don,

    Thanks for posting this message…great stuff! When I reflect back on my best performances as a leader, I think of Brian. He and I were colleagues at the time and we developed a very high level of trust and mutual respect. Out of that came many times when we could openly share feedback with each other. Because of the high trust, I can honestly remember when he had really harsh words of feedback…I never perceived it as a threat. Instead, I usually asked more questions about what he was saying to get clarity on how to improve.

    Fast forward to today…I work with more athletic coaches and I find it more common that they like to coach but not be coachable, e.g. receive feedback. It’s a much different environment and one I find interesting. How do you get a coach to receive feedback on their skills like they try to do with their athletes?

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    Ed Garrison

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    Sounds very similar to what Patrick Lencioni writes about in his 5 Dysfunctions of A Team book that we use in our leadership programs,

    Forget about how smart people are. They can always get smart or more technically competent. If they are not personally interested in and want to be in relationship with others on the team, work becomes just that …..WORK

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    Erik Golbiw

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    Don – The only thing I would argue is that his life was one of solitude – He had God with him. Always.

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    Eleazar

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    Very moving! Thank you for sharing!
    Also, thank you for the great work you provide. I always look forward to reading my Daily Dose of Greatness each morning.

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      Neel Dekle

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      Don thank you for sharing Stuart Scott’s amazing acceptance speech. We can all learn and live by his comments of life’s wisdom. And…thanks for all you do for so many as well. You have a great following yourself!!

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    Dean Budney

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    Powerful message Don! Thank you for sharing it. Please keep up the great work!

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    Leighton Cubbage

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    This is a powerful and timely example of someone who overcame by attitude and work.
    “Why not you ? ” That’s an inspirational and fast thought changer for me and now my family. Thanks so much .
    Leighton Cubbage
    Greenville , SC

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      Don Yaeger

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      Leighton, thank you for reading the blog and sharing it with your family! We can all ask ourselves this simple question to progress every day: “Why not you?”

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    Michael

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    Don,
    Wow! This is so true. i have a 14 year old son who aspires to greatness in his sport and i will pass this along to him so that he has another “greatness” barometer.
    Thanks

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      Don Yaeger

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      Michael, thank you for your comment and sharing the blog with your son! I hope he is inspired to pursue Greatness in all his efforts!

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    Dave

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    Great kid, glad his dad listened to the motto of the 2004 Boston Red Sox which they had on their World Series t-shirts, “Why Not Us?” That’s the heart of a champion.

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      Don Yaeger

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      Dave, that’s a great anecdote! Thanks for the reminder and your comment!

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    tom savino

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    he learned from his dad never let your circumstances direct your path

    great message!!!! Go Seahawks!!!

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      Don Yaeger

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      Tom, exactly. We can all learn and apply Russell’s lesson to our own lives. It’s a universal message! Thank you for your comment!

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    Gary Campbell

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    Don, I reference Russell Wilson in many of my leadership development discussions. Great blog. His work ethic alone inspires and the leadership qualities he exhibits obviously were home grown. Nice piece!

    Gary

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    Bruce

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    I have a Daughter, who had the Focus and Passion, to be a Steeplechaser Rider, in a Man’s World, but her ‘Drive’, and Work ethic, made Her, the Top Money Winning Steeplechaser Rider, in Very Old Sport !!! She TOO, Finished College, while Riding Races, and after she Retired, had 2 Children, and came back, 9 Years later, to Win, our Biggest Timber Race, again, against the Men !!! Will and Determination can do it !

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    Frances Hall

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    Don,
    I read this to my son at dinner last night – he is 10 and plays flag football but is one of the smaller kids on the team…you have inspired him! :) Thank you!

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    David Crisp

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    Your value does not decrease based on someone’s inability to see your worth, you are fearfully and wonderfully made, look at yourself through His eyes, and excel ! Great article ! Thanks Don

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    Beckie Saupé-Kohler

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    My husband & 2 young boys brought me in to hear Russell’s story at the end of the game; all 3 of them were touched and in tears. My 2 boys are very small in stature & weight for their ages, but they are both one of the best athletes in their age groups. This story inspires me to always continue to praise on my kids, pouring huge belief into them and showing them that they were given a gift, talent & ability from God; that no matter what it is, it needs to be carried out & followed through, regardless of the adversity & disadvantages that they will face, in life & in sports to achieve their dreams.

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    Lisa

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    Thanks so much for writing this great article. I am a Hawks fan but am one of those people who has a harder time being a fan if I can’t respect the players. I appreciate Russell for the amazing player and leader that he is, but much more important to me is who he is as a person. He is an amazing, caring and giving man who has the strength to show his love for God. These are the things that make me a fan of Russell Wilson.

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    Becky Burleigh

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    Hi Don,
    Becky from UF…we met at HumanEx in MI. Wanted to chat with you when you have time. My number is __________. Thought I had your number, but i must have misplaced it. I enjoy your blog!

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    Jim McArdle

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    Don ,

    Heard you speak at a Synnex conference and really enjoyed the message.

    All the best,

    Jim

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    katherine Mcnally

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    I very much appreciated your comments . I am the President of a Interim Healthcare of Greater NY. I had employed a Home health Aide who had a rough start in life . She was funny and engaging and had an interesting perspective on life and a cultural up-bring that was a disadvantage. She made it a point everytime I was in town to visit that office she would stop by to say hello . She eventually left our organization to complete her college degree. I hired her to work in the office and she is doing well. She would like to write a book about her experiences . She is a inspiration and a mentor to many who have come from where she has been and she is truly a success story

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      Don Yaeger

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      Wow! What an amazing story! Thank you for sharing it with me Katherine!

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    Shawn

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    Good stuff Don and congrats! Can’t wait to get my copy!!!

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    adam

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    I agree-A lot of people say, through their actions, what they did to win or be successful in the past is enough to have it repeated. I like the constructive moments in wins or losses. Everyone we should ask “did i/we do everything possible to improve and be better ?” Winning and losing happens by 8 points or 1 point you can’t afford NOT to ask the above questions of yourself!

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    Arthur Brault

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    Don – thanks again for such an insightful blog highlighting the importance of ‘doing your homework’ and understanding the tremendous lessons derived from history. I wish more colleagues (and Americans) would invest the time necessary to develop an informed position. Good luck with your latest book and best wishes for continued success.

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    Michelle R Vogt

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    Thank you for for this timely article!

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    Jim Johnson

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    Look forward to the Wooden series. Keep up your great work Don!

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    Nathan

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    I love it so excited to take these stratagies into my business. All my managers are going to read this.

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    Tyrone Thomas

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    Great interview Don! All the best to you and your family.

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    Dr. Arthur Ciaramicoli

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    Great inspiring interview Don, stories we all can relate to and model.

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About Don Yaeger

Don Yaeger

Don Yaeger is a Certified Speaking Professional (CSP), longtime Associate Editor for Sports Illustrated, 11-time New York Times best-selling author, leadership expert and executive coach.

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